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All IPCC definitions taken from Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Working Group I Contribution to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Annex I, Glossary, pp. 941-954. Cambridge University Press.

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #35

Posted on 2 September 2019 by John Hartz

A chronological listing of news articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, Aug 25 through Sat, Aug 31, 2019

Editor's Pick

Hurricane Dorian is a powerful Category 4 hurricane — pummeling the Bahamas and heading “dangerously close” to Florida

A worst-case scenario is playing out the Bahamas. Florida and the Southeast US may be spared the worst. But uncertainties remain.

Hurricane Dorian over Grand Bahama Island on 09-02-19

Hurricane Dorian on September 2. NOAA/NESDIS/STAR

On Monday, Hurricane Dorian slammed into the Abacos Islands in the Bahamas as an incredibly powerful Category 5 hurricane, with howling winds in excess of 185 mph and with gusts up to 220 mph. The storm brought with it a surge — coastal flooding — of 18-to-23 feet above normal tide.

Dorian is estimated to be the second-most powerful hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic Ocean, and ties the record for the most powerful storm to make landfall, according to the National Weather Service. Preliminary reports from the Abacos Islands show extreme devastation.

The storm weakened slightly and was (very slowly) moving through Grand Bahama Island on Monday, with winds gusting over 200 mph and 18 to 23 feet of coastal flooding. Plus, the forward motion of the storm nearly stalled, moving west at just 1 mph. The slower a storm moves, the more time it has to destroy communities in its path. It’s a worst-case scenario for a hurricane.

Hurricane Dorian is a powerful Category 4 hurricane — pummeling the Bahamas and heading "dangerously close" to Florida by Brian Resnick, Energy & Environment, Vox, Sep 2, 2019

Click here to access the entire article as posted on Vox. 


Links posted on Facebook

Sun Aug 25, 2019

Mon Aug 26, 2019

Tue Aug 27, 2019

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Fri Aug 30, 2019

Sat Aug 31, 2019

[On Vacation]

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Comments

Comments 1 to 3:

  1. Hurricane Dorian is another slow moving Hurricane thus potentially being more damaging. Slow moving hurricanes are associated with climate change and dump more rain.

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  2. I seem to remember that Florida is where the well off; those that made their money ignoring climate change, have retired to.  Sea level rise and monster storms couldn't happen to a more deserving people. A nice twist is that the poorer people live on an inland ridge while the rich, retired are right down on the beach.

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  3. @William

    1. "I seem to remember that Florida is where the well off; those that made their money ignoring climate change, have retired to."

    2. ""Sea level rise and monster storms couldn't happen to a more deserving people.""

    It appears you have never been to, much less lived in Florida. 

     People who saved and are able to afford a pleasant retirement did not do so by "ignoring climate change", they did so by a dozen different means. Some made retirement nest eggs from saving 7% every year from age 23, some had public sector retirement at age 55, then continue working in some other capacity while collecting a generous pension.  Some were the person who opened the town's best roti-roll joint and then 3 satellites, some developed an app that took off. Some were in  government or other forms of organized crime. 

    What they have in common is that they wasted no time being gloating over bad things happening to people more successful than themselves. 

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