Climate Science Glossary

Term Lookup

Enter a term in the search box to find its definition.

Settings

Use the controls in the far right panel to increase or decrease the number of terms automatically displayed (or to completely turn that feature off).

Term Lookup

Settings


All IPCC definitions taken from Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Working Group I Contribution to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Annex I, Glossary, pp. 941-954. Cambridge University Press.

Home Arguments Software Resources Comments The Consensus Project Translations About Donate

Twitter Facebook YouTube Pinterest MeWe

RSS Posts RSS Comments Email Subscribe


Climate's changed before
It's the sun
It's not bad
There is no consensus
It's cooling
Models are unreliable
Temp record is unreliable
Animals and plants can adapt
It hasn't warmed since 1998
Antarctica is gaining ice
View All Arguments...



Username
Password
New? Register here
Forgot your password?

Latest Posts

Archives

The Climate Show Episode 12: twisters, ozone and Google in the sun

Posted on 6 May 2011 by John Cook

The Climate Show have just released Episode 12. Ozone is the centrepiece this week, with Dr Olaf Morgenstern of NIWA's Central Otago atmospheric science lab (celebrating its 50th birthday at the moment) explaining the ins and outs of the ozone holes north and south, and their impacts on the climate system. Plus tornadoes, heatwaves, UN negotiations at an impasse, more melting in the Arctic, airships, see-through solar cells and Google's solar towers. I didn't talk with Glenn and Gareth this eipsode as I was launching Climate Change Denial on the day of the recording. I haven't had a chance to listen to this ep yet - I like to download the iTunes audio onto my iPod and catch up on the latest climate news while driving or doing chores.

0 0

Printable Version  |  Link to this page

Comments

Comments 1 to 1:

  1. Hey, it's 15 minutes shorter than last episode! :-) I like to watch the videos myself - the figures, charts, and images that are interspersed add a lot to the story being told. And it's easy enough to have it open in a browser window, while doing something else on the PC (as much as my wife might be amused by me watching a vidcast and playing a game or working on a presentation for work at the same time...) Either way, I guess I know what I'm doing with my Friday night, now (yes, I am that boring! ;-)
    0 0

You need to be logged in to post a comment. Login via the left margin or if you're new, register here.



The Consensus Project Website

THE ESCALATOR

(free to republish)


© Copyright 2021 John Cook
Home | Links | Translations | About Us | Privacy | Contact Us