Climate Science Glossary

Term Lookup

Enter a term in the search box to find its definition.

Settings

Use the controls in the far right panel to increase or decrease the number of terms automatically displayed (or to completely turn that feature off).

Term Lookup

Settings


All IPCC definitions taken from Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Working Group I Contribution to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Annex I, Glossary, pp. 941-954. Cambridge University Press.

Home Arguments Software Resources Comments The Consensus Project Translations About Donate

Twitter Facebook YouTube Pinterest MeWe

RSS Posts RSS Comments Email Subscribe


Climate's changed before
It's the sun
It's not bad
There is no consensus
It's cooling
Models are unreliable
Temp record is unreliable
Animals and plants can adapt
It hasn't warmed since 1998
Antarctica is gaining ice
View All Arguments...



Username
Password
New? Register here
Forgot your password?

Latest Posts

Archives

2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #33

Posted on 16 August 2020 by John Hartz

Story of the Week... El Niño/La Niña Update... Toon of the Week... Coming Soon on SkS... Climate Feedback Claim Review... SkS Week in Review... Poster of the Week...

Story of the Week...

Going, Going ... Gone: Greenland’s Melting Ice Sheet Passed a Point of No Return in the Early 2000s

A new study finds that the accelerating retreat and thinning of Greenland’s glaciers that began 20 year ago is speeding the ice sheet toward total meltdown.

Greenland, Aug 1, 2019

Water from the Greenland ice sheet flows through heather and peat during unseasonably warm weather on Aug. 1, 2019. Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images 

The Greenland Ice Sheet managed to withstand the warming brought by the first 150 years of the industrial age, with enough snow piling up each winter to balance the ice lost to spring and summer melting. But, according to a new study, that all changed 20 years ago.

Starting in 2000, Greenland's glaciers suddenly began moving faster, their snouts rapidly retreating and thinning where they flow into the sea. Between 2000 and 2005, that acceleration led to an all-but irreversible "step-increase" of ice loss, scientists concluded in the new research, published this week in the journal Nature Communications Earth & Environment.

If the climate were to stop warming today, or even cool a little, Greenland's ice will continue to melt, said Ohio State University Earth scientist Ian Howat, co-author of the research paper. "Glacier retreat has knocked the dynamics of the whole ice sheet into a constant state of loss," he said. "Even if we were to stabilize at current temperatures, the ice will continue to disintegrate more quickly than if we hadn't messed with the climate to begin with."

Click here to acces the entire article originally posted on the InsideClimate New website.

Going, Going ... Gone: Greenland’s Melting Ice Sheet Passed a Point of No Return in the Early 2000s by Bob Berwyn, InsideClimate News, Aug 15, 2020


El Niño/La Niña Update...

La Niña Watch increases one month before peak hurricane season

La Nina Summer Conditions

Typical conditions for La Nina in summer

Forecasters are now calling for an increased chance of La Niña this autumn, which could enhance an already overly active hurricane season.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), issued a La Niña Watch in July. Now, the agency has issued an update further showing their confidence that La Niña could form this autumn.

"The La Niña Watch that was issued back in July has now increased to 60% for this fall," says Haley Brink, CNN meteorologist. "When a La Niña Watch is issued that means that conditions are favorable for development within the next six months. An advisory can then be issued once La Niña conditions are observed."

Click here to access the entire article originally posted on CNN.

La Niña Watch increases one month before peak hurricane season by Allison Chinchar, CNN, Aug 16, 2020


Toon of the Week...

2020 Toom 33 

Hat tip to the Stop Climate Science Denial Facebook page.


Coming Soon on SkS...

  • Scientists remember 'Koni' Steffen, glaciologist who died after fall into crevasse in Greenland (Bud Ward)
  • Scientists seek to collect ice core samples before glaciers and ice sheets melt (Kristen Pope)
  • SkS New Research for Week #33 (Doug Bostrom)
  • Siberia’s 2020 heatwave made ‘600 times more likely’ by climate change (Daisy Dunne)
  • Will Fusion Power solve Climate Change? (Climate Adam)
  • 2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #34 (John Hartz)
  • 2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #34 (John Hartz)

Climate Feedback Claim Review...

The long-term survival of polar bears is threatened by loss of sea-ice due to global warming, new study confirms

CLAIM: "Global warming is driving polar bears toward extinction"

VERDICT: Correct

SOURCE: Global Warming Is Driving Polar Bears Toward Extinction, Researchers Say by Henry Fountain, Climate, New York Times, July 20, 2020

KEY TAKE AWAY: Sea-ice loss due to global warming is the most important threat to long-term survival and reproduction of polar bears. Under a high greenhouse gas emissions scenario, all but a few polar bear subpopulations are at risk of extinction by 2100. In the moderate greenhouse gas emissions scenario, some polar bear subpopulations could persist through the century.

Click here to access the entire article originally posted on the Climate Feedback website.

The long-term survival of polar bears is threatened by loss of sea-ice due to global warming, new study confirms, Edited by Nikki Forrester, Climate Feedback, July 27, 2020


SkS Week in Review... 


Poster of the Week...

2020 Poster 33 

0 0

Printable Version  |  Link to this page

Comments

There have been no comments posted yet.

You need to be logged in to post a comment. Login via the left margin or if you're new, register here.



The Consensus Project Website

THE ESCALATOR

(free to republish)


© Copyright 2020 John Cook
Home | Links | Translations | About Us | Privacy | Contact Us