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Climate Hustle

SkS Weekly Digest - First Edition

Posted on 6 June 2011 by John Hartz

For the week ending Saturday, June 4, 2011


Welcome to the inaugural edition of the SkS Weekly Digest. It not only provides a brief synopsis of each Skeptical Science article posted during the "week that was", but also provides a sneak preview of what's in the Skeptical Science pipeline. Other special features will be added as the design and content of the bulletin evolve.

Please let us know what you think about this initiative. We're particularly interested in learning how many of you would prefer to receive this weekly bulletin rather than the individual email announcements about each article as they are posted throughout the week.   


 

Of Averages & Anomalies - Part 2A. Why Surface Temperature records are more robust than we think

Posted on 4 June 2011 by Glenn Tamblyn

 In Part 1A and Part 1B we looked at how surface temperature trends are calculated, the importance of using Temperature Anomalies as your starting point before doing any averaging and why this can make our temperature record more robust.In this Part 2A and a later Part 2B we will look at a number of the claims made about ‘problems’ in the record and how misperceptions about how the record is calculated can lead us to think that it is more fragile than it actually is.

 


 

CO2 – Some facts, figures and outcomes

Posted on 3 June 2011 by Agnostic

The largest source of increasing CO2 in the atmosphere since 1850 is from the burning of fossil fuels and vegetation, arising from human activity.  These emissions pose a threat to the survivability of all on the planet.  The following invites attention to the sources of CO2 emissions, some of their effects and measures which might be taken to enforce their reduction.

 


 

IEA CO2 Emissions Update 2010 - Bad News

Posted on 3 June 2011 by dana1981 & John Abraham

The International Energy Agency (IEA) has released unpublished estimates of 2010 global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, and the news is not good.  Between 2003 and 2008, emissions had been rising at a rate faster than the IPCC worst case scenario.  However, the global recession slowed the emissions growth considerably, and in fact they actually declined slightly from 29.4 billion tons (gigatons, or Gt) CO2 in 2008, to 29 Gt in 2009.

 


 

Amazon drought: A death spiral? (Part 3: 2005 & 2010 droughts)

Posted on 2 June 2011 by Rob Painting

By and large, the mainstream media has a pretty dismal record in reporting about climate change, and a recent op-ed in the National Post, written by Lawrence Solomon, continues in this vein. In the piece, Solomon makes light of the dire threat global warming poses to the continued existence of the Amazon rainforest. After the IPCC Amazon non-controversy, it's probably time to look at the issue in a bit more depth, and debunk Solomon at the same time. 

 


 

The Critical Decade - Part 2: Climate Risks

 

Posted on 1 June 2011 by dana1981

The Australian government established a Climate Commission which recently released a three chapter report entitled The Critical Decade.  In Part 1, we examined Chapter 1 of the report, which summarizes the current state of climate science observational data.  In this second part of the series, we will examine Chapter 2 of the report, which discusses the risks associated with a changing climate.  The quotes and bullets below come directly from the report, while the remainder is our commentary.


 

Amazon drought: A death spiral? (Part 2: climate models)

 

Posted on 1 June 2011 by Rob Painting

 

By and large, the mainstream media has a pretty dismal record in reporting about climate change, and a recent op-ed in the National Post, written by Lawrence Solomon, continues in this vein. In the piece, Solomon makes light of the dire threat global warming poses to the continued existence of the Amazon rainforest. After the IPCC Amazon non-controversy, it's probably time to look at the issue in a bit more depth, and debunk Solomon at the same time. 

 


Database of peer-reviewed papers: classification problematics

Posted on 31 May 2011 by Ari Jokimäki

While adding papers to the peer-reviewed paper database here in Skeptical Science, many problematic issues have emerged. In the database, papers are entered under certain skeptic arguments. For any paper, one can enter several arguments that are relevant to the paper in question. Each paper gets a classification pro-agw/neutral/skeptic depending on how the paper sees the argument in question. It is not very straight-forward task to assign a classification for each paper.


An Interactive History of Climate Science

Posted on 31 May 2011 by John Cook

 

For years, I've been casually accumulating a database of peer-reviewed climate papers. A few months ago, some Skeptical Science contributors began brainstorming creative ways to visualise this database - a kind of visual sequel to Naomi Oreskes' famous Science paper on consensus. Paul D decided to take it a step further and began programming a Javascript visualisation that very cleverly packs an incredible amount of information into a single, user-friendly graphic. The visualisation displays the number of climate papers published each year, sorted into skeptic/neutral/pro-AGW categories (more on these categorisations shortly). What really blew me away is the slider at the bottom - drag it from left to right to observe the evolution of climate science research from Joseph Fourier in 1824 to the flood of research in 2011.

 


Are you a genuine skeptic or a climate denier?

Posted on 30 May 2011 by John Cook

The ABC Drum have just published my article Are you a genuine skeptic or a climate denier? Right now, there are no comments but I imagine the discussion will get fierce shortly so be sure to keep an eye on it (expect to see all the traits of denial I describe rear their ugly head in the comments and be quick to point them out).


Shaping Tomorrow's World After One Month

Posted on 30 May 2011 by Stephan Lewandowsky

About a month ago, we unveiled Shaping Tomorrows World, a website dedicated to exploring solutions to the multiple crises and challenges that are currently facing our societies.


Of Averages and Anomalies - Part 1B. How the Surface Temperature records are built

Posted on 30 May 2011 by Glenn Tamblyn

In Part 1A we looked at how a reasonable temperature record needs to be compiled. Here, we look at how the major temperature products are built


Of Averages and Anomalies - Part 1A. A Primer on how to measure surface temperature change

Posted on 29 May 2011 by Glenn Tamblyn

In recent years a number of claims have been made about ‘problems’ with the surface temperature record: that it is faulty, biased, or even ‘being manipulated’. Many of the criticisms often seem to revolve around misunderstandings of how the calculations are done and thus exaggerated ideas of how vulnerable to error the analysis of the record is. In this series I intend to look at how the temperature records are built and why they are actually quite robust. In this first post (Part 1A) I am going to discuss the basic principles of how a reasonable surface temperature record should be assembled, Then in Part 1B I will look at how the major temperature products are built. Finally in Parts 2A and 2B I will then look at a number of the claims of ‘faults’ against this to see if they hold water or are exaggerated based on misconceptions.


The Critical Decade - Part 1: The Science

Posted on 28 May 2011 by dana1981

The Australian government established a Climate Commission which recently released a three chapter report entitled The Critical Decade.  The first chapter of the report, which we will examine in this post, summarizes the current state of climate science observational data. 


If It's Not Sex, Drugs, and Rock'n Roll, what is it? Creativity maybe?

Posted on 27 May 2011 by Stephan Lewandowsky

 

“Let’s face it. The 1960’s were a time of radical change. And what we need today, like it or not, is another substantial transformation of our societies—from our current fossil-fuel based economies to an alternative means of economic productivity that is based on other sources of energy.”


What's in the SkS Pipeline?

  • Poleward motion of storm tracks

  •  Christy Crock #6: Climate Sensitivity

  • History Matters: Carbon Emissions in Context

  • The Critical Decade - Part 3: Carbon Emissions Reductions

  • Geologists & Climate Change Denial

  • Trouble Brewing in the North

  • Ocean Acidification: Some Winners, Many Losers

  • Websites for watching the Arctic sea ice melt

  • Examining Dr. John Christy's Global Warming Skepticism

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Comments

Comments 1 to 12:

  1. For my money the weekly update would be better. It would mean less emails for you to send and I visit the site every working day anyway.

    BTW A big thankyou to everyone who contributes to the site. As an historian and not a climate scinetist I find this site provides comprehensive information in a format I can easily understand. The contributors have been patient and helpful will any questions I have asked (and some of the debates can be highly amusing and witty at times).
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  2. Speaking for myself, I don't think this is necessary. I read SkS primarily via google reader so I can mark which entries I yet have to read.
    Maybe it will be more useful for other readers!
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  3. I really, really like the upcoming topics idea.

    Adds a bit of interest to checking in.
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  4. All the links are broken.;)
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  5. More precisely, all the 'non-title' links (the blue ones) are broken.
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  6. Thks snowhare - it's a glitch in the system. Hopefully someone who is able to fix it will be along soon.
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  7. I like to receive the individual announcements. I would not have the time to read so much if I received it all at once (SkS is getting increasingly prolific!)

    So the summary of past week does not interest me so much. OTOH, it's good to know what's coming.
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  8. Mea culpa.

    My apologies for the technical glitches in the inagural edition of this new feature. This is the first document that I have created for publication. I'm still on a steep learning curve with respect to the technical side of things.

    Thank you for your understanding and for your feedback.
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  9. If you click the red links to go to the articles themselves, the blue links will work there.
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  10. Link to Amazon Part 3 is misdirected. Thanks.
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  11. That is, the red link directs you to a different post.
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  12. Looks good to me.

    1 Perhaps this digest should be the only way into the individual postings because, being considerably narrower, they are much easier to read. With the current postings, which are too wide, I often lose which line I am on and find myself reading the same line again, or the next but one, which, as you can imagine, is a bit confusing and no aid to comprehension. The last thing we need is to lose readership because of technicalities. Failing that, go straight to the narrow form on opening specific email postings (the one with the comments section at the end). This would have the added benefit of guiding any newcomer seeking knowledge on climate change to the large reservior of information available from SkS (in the side bars).

    2 You could try bringing all the comments on all the linked articles into the comments section of the weekly digest (see chrismartenson.com weekly newsletter as an example) instead of the currrent arrangement. For instance, if I wished to reply to, say, fred1234's comment (item 96) about the Amazon Death Spiral, it would take the form: Amazon DS, fred1234 @ 96 .... That way, people would get to see all comments about all articles automatically without the need to open each specific one. You never know, a comment on an article that had originally been skipped might pique someone's interest enough to change their mind and read it. More importantly, someone expert in a particular field might in passing notice a comment that is incorrect and feel obligued to set the matter straight, even though they had originally only bothered with the article but not had time to read the comments section. That way we all win.

    As far as I am concerned, you can forget posting articles individually because from now on I will wait for the digest and dedicate time to an indepth weekly climate change session at my computer (the dog will just have to wait for his walk).
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